2018 Mar 08

Ready for more-than-human? Measuring urban residents’ willingness to coexist with animals (Christoph Rupprecht)

adminfeast Uncategorized, WG1_Publications

A peer-reviewed paper “Ready for more-than-human? Measuring urban residents’ willingness to coexist with animals” by Christoph Rupprecht (FEAST Project Researcher), which includes the research outputs of WG1, was published on Fennia-International Journal of Geography. Abstract: In the context of rapid urbanisation, geographers are calling for embracing non-humans as urban co-inhabitants. But if animals and plants are seen as ‘out of place’, sharing urban space can lead to wildlife conflicts. We therefore need to better understand residents’ willingness to coexist if we are to work towards more-than-human cities. This study quantitatively compared residents’ preferences toward sharing their neighbourhood, as well as perceptions of belonging across...

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2017 Dec 19

The 1st RIHN/UCB International Workshop (Christoph Rupprecht)

adminfeast Seminar & Workshop, WG1_Publications

On November 6-7th,  the first RIH/UCB International Workshop “Food, Agriculture, and Human Impacts on the Environment: Japan, Asia and Beyond” to commemorate the signing of a memorandum of understanding was held on the Berkeley campus. Christoph Rupprecht, Project Researcher, gave a talk on the WG1 research outputs as follows: Part I. Food and Agriculture Session 1. Urban biocultural food production & Food security Christoph Rupprecht | Biocultural cityscapes: towards urban landscape stewardship Industrialized food systems leave cities vulnerable to food supply disruptions, disruptions likely to increase due to climate change. Urban residents also lack opportunities to self-produce food. Urban agriculture, community and...

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2017 Aug 06

Informal Urban Green Space: Residents’ Perception, Use, and Management Preferences across Four Major Japanese Shrinking Cities

adminfeast WG1_Publications

Abstract: Urban residents’ health depends on green infrastructure to cope with climate change. Shrinking cities could utilize vacant land to provide more green space, but declining tax revenues preclude new park development—a situation pronounced in Japan, where some cities are projected to shrink by over ten percent, but lack green space. Could informal urban green spaces (IGS; vacant lots, street verges, brownfields etc.) supplement parks in shrinking cities? This study analyzes residents’ perception, use, and management preferences (management goals, approaches to participatory management, willingness to participate) for IGS using a large, representative online survey (n = 1000) across four major...

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2017 Mar 06

Enough is as good as a feast: here’s how we can imagine a brighter food future

adminfeast Report, WG1_Publications

The World Economic Forum’s 2017 report on the future of food examines what the world’s food systems might look like in 2030. But none of the four future scenarios it presents is particularly attractive. To create a world where everyone can eat well without wrecking the planet, we need better ideas, a rich imagination and the right tools. Read the full article at The Conversation! Author: Rupprecht, CDD

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2015 Jan 01

How can Mediterranean societies thrive in an era of decreasing resources?

adminfeast Report, WG1_Publications

Highlights: The average Food Footprint of a Mediterranean resident is approximately 0.9 gha per person—with a range from 0.6 gha—thus higher than that of such countries as India (0.4 gha), China (0.5 gha), Costa Rica (0.6 gha) and Germany (0.8 gha). In analysis of 12 Mediterranean cities, Cairo has the highest total Ecological Footprint, followed by Barcelona and Rome. The Mediterranean cities with the highest Ecological Footprint per person are Genoa, Athens and Rome. The Mediterranean cities with the lowest Ecological Footprint per person are Antalya, Cairo and Izmur. The demand for renewable resources in Athens exceeds the entire nation...

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2014 Jun 20

Informal urban green-space: comparison of quantity and characteristics in Brisbane, Australia and Sapporo, Japan

adminfeast WG1_Publications

Abstract: Informal urban green-space (IGS) such as vacant lots, brownfields and street or railway verges is receiving growing attention from urban scholars. Research has shown IGS can provide recreational space for residents and habitat for flora and fauna, yet we know little about the quantity, spatial distribution, vegetation structure or accessibility of IGS. We also lack a commonly accepted definition of IGS and a method that can be used for its rapid quantitative assessment. This paper advances a definition and typology of IGS that has potential for global application. Based on this definition, IGS land use percentage in central Brisbane,...

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