2018 Jul 04

A peer-reviewed paper on Food Policy Council published on Journal

FEAST HQ WG2_Publications

A peer-reviewed paper “Development of Food Policy Councils  in North America and its implication (tentative English title)” co-authored by Masashi Tachikawa (Nagoya University) , Steven McGreevy, Motoki Akitsu (Kyoto University) and Momoe Oga (then-Ritsumeikan University)  (in Japanese) was published on "Journal of Food System Research, 23 (3)". Abstract: The contemporary food system has various problems, such as contributing to food access disparity and negative health impacts. In response to these issues, there is growing attention toward food policy councils (FPC) in North America. FPC is a kind of platform where various stakeholders work together to find local solutions to the above-mentioned...

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2018 Jul 03

A peer-reviewed paper on revitalizing rurality published on "Journal of Rural Studies"

FEAST HQ WG2_Publications

A peer-reviewed paper " Revitalising rurality under the neoliberal transformation of agriculture: Experiences of re-agrarianisation in Japan" co-authored by Prof. Shuji Hisano (Kyoto University, Project Member), Prof. Motoki Akitsu (Kyoto University, WG2 Chair) and Project Leader Steven R. McGreevy was published on an international journal, Journal of Rural Studies. "Revitalising rurality under the neoliberal transformation of agriculture: Experiences of re-agrarianisation in Japan" by Shuji Hisano, Motoki Akitsu, Steven R. McGreevy Abstract: Rural places are continually experiencing socio-economic change and the conceptual frameworks of re-de-agrarianisation and re-de-peasantisation were devised to explain agrarian transformations in a broad sense. Following empirical studies from...

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2018 Jul 03

A peer-reviewed paper of WG1's research on land use in Kyoto City published on "Sustainability"

FEAST HQ WG1_Publications

A peer-reviewed paper "Urban Agriculture as a Sustainability Transition Strategy for Shrinking Cities? Land Use Change Trajectory as an Obstacle in Kyoto City, Japan" co-authored by Kimisato Oda, Christoph Rupprecht, Kazuaki Tsuchiya (The University of Tokyo) and Steven McGreevy was published on an international journal, Sustainability 10(4). "Urban Agriculture as a Sustainability Transition Strategy for Shrinking Cities? Land Use Change Trajectory as an Obstacle in Kyoto City, Japan" by Kimisato Oda, Christoph D. D. Rupprecht, Kazuaki Tsuchiya and Steven R. McGreevy Abstract: Can shrinking cities harness population decline to improve their sustainability by repurposing land use, for example, for localizing...

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2018 Jul 03

Prof. Yuji Hara's paper published on "Sustainability"

FEAST HQ WG1_Publications

A peer-reviewed paper "The Minabe-Tanabe Ume System: Linkage of Landscape Units by Locals" by Prof. Yuji Hara at Wakayama University was published on "Sustainability 10(4)". "The Minabe-Tanabe Ume System: Linkage of Landscape Units by Locals" by Yuji Hara, Yuki Sampei and Hirotaka Tanaka Abstract:This paper focuses on the Minabe-Tanabe Ume system, which was designated as a Globally Important Agricultural Heritage Systems (GIAHS) in December of 2015. Because landholdings reflect historical social connections among various landscape units, we quantitatively examined the landscape characteristics of the system by preparing digitized spatial data and performing geographic information system analysis. We also examined the...

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2018 Mar 08

Ready for more-than-human? Measuring urban residents’ willingness to coexist with animals (Christoph Rupprecht)

FEAST HQ WG1_Publications

A peer-reviewed paper “Ready for more-than-human? Measuring urban residents’ willingness to coexist with animals” by Christoph Rupprecht (FEAST Project Researcher), which includes the research outputs of WG1, was published on Fennia-International Journal of Geography. Abstract: In the context of rapid urbanisation, geographers are calling for embracing non-humans as urban co-inhabitants. But if animals and plants are seen as ‘out of place’, sharing urban space can lead to wildlife conflicts. We therefore need to better understand residents’ willingness to coexist if we are to work towards more-than-human cities. This study quantitatively compared residents’ preferences toward sharing their neighbourhood, as well as perceptions of belonging across...

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2018 Mar 01

Effect of dolomite and biochar addition on N2O and CO2 emissions from acidic tea field soil

FEAST HQ WG4_Publications, WG4_Publications

A paper entitled “Effect of dolomite and biochar addition on N2O and CO2 emissions from acidic tea field soil” by Dr. Shigeto Sudo (Institute for Agro-Environmental Sciences, National Agriculture and Food Research Organization (NIAES)) and Prof. Akira Shibata (OIC Research Organization, Ritsumeikan University), Chairs of WG4, was published on PLOS ONE. Abstract: A laboratory study was conducted to study the effects of liming and different biochar amendments on N2O and CO2 emissions from acidic tea field soil. The first experiment was done with three different rates of N treatment; N 300 (300 kg N ha-1), N 600 (600 kg N...

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2017 Aug 06

Informal Urban Green Space: Residents’ Perception, Use, and Management Preferences across Four Major Japanese Shrinking Cities

FEAST HQ WG1_Publications

Abstract: Urban residents’ health depends on green infrastructure to cope with climate change. Shrinking cities could utilize vacant land to provide more green space, but declining tax revenues preclude new park development—a situation pronounced in Japan, where some cities are projected to shrink by over ten percent, but lack green space. Could informal urban green spaces (IGS; vacant lots, street verges, brownfields etc.) supplement parks in shrinking cities? This study analyzes residents’ perception, use, and management preferences (management goals, approaches to participatory management, willingness to participate) for IGS using a large, representative online survey (n = 1000) across four major...

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2014 Jun 20

Informal urban green-space: comparison of quantity and characteristics in Brisbane, Australia and Sapporo, Japan

FEAST HQ WG1_Publications

Abstract: Informal urban green-space (IGS) such as vacant lots, brownfields and street or railway verges is receiving growing attention from urban scholars. Research has shown IGS can provide recreational space for residents and habitat for flora and fauna, yet we know little about the quantity, spatial distribution, vegetation structure or accessibility of IGS. We also lack a commonly accepted definition of IGS and a method that can be used for its rapid quantitative assessment. This paper advances a definition and typology of IGS that has potential for global application. Based on this definition, IGS land use percentage in central Brisbane,...

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